Volunteers Mean We Don’t Do It Alone

Volunteers Mean We Don’t Do It Alone

By Alejandra Diaz-
 
Last week I wrote about the largest mission team to ever visit Dorie’s Promise. While it is exciting to see this increase, we are blessed by local volunteers like Omar David.
 
Omar David is a native of Guatemala who later moved to Costa Rica after his father died. His mother remarried an Italian American who worked for the Foreign Service.
 
Finally, the family relocated to Maryland, where Omar went to junior and senior high school. After earning degrees in business administration and economics at the University of Maryland, he returned to Guatemala in 1984.
 
“I try to help in any way I can,” said Omar, who visits every Thursday to deliver food and other supplies. “It feels almost selfish to me because I get much more out of the love the kids give me than I could ever give to them.”
 
He first heard about the orphanage from our medical director, Dr. Francisco Castro, whom he met on the tennis court. Several months later, Omar’s niece contacted him, asking where she could come and help. Dr. Castro offered her the chance to work at the orphanage.
 
A year later, Dr. Castro visited Omar’s sporting goods distributorship to make a purchase.
 
When Omar asked if there was anything he could do to help Dorie’s Promise, Dr. Castro replied that he was short on vaccines for the children and caretakers.
 
“From that moment on, I started calling associates and friends,” Omar recalls. “I was amazed at how many of them wanted to help, but just did not know how they could do so.”
 
Although his primary personal objective is raising funds for vaccines, medical supplies and other needed medications, Omar took his involvement a step further.
 
Last October, he started coming on Thursday with donations, including a Thanksgiving dinner in November. Instead of turkey Omar and his son brought ham and all the trimmings, plus cake and pie.
 
Each week Omar delivers donations from friends and fellow church members— everything from toys and clothing to milk and food. His friend, Luis Ayala, offers produce each week from his farm, such as plantains, bananas, lemons and tomatoes.
 
Omar is working to arrange a trip for the children to the tennis club where he is a member for an exhibition game featuring players sponsored by a sporting goods manufacturer. Plans include a tennis clinic for the kids.
 
“In addition, my congregation has been looking for outreach programs,” said Omar, who belongs to an Episcopal church. “I hope to get them involved in either raising more funds for medicines, or helping with the outreach program the orphanage has with the dump.”
 
Omar isn’t alone. We have students and others who provide everything from companionship to dental services. All are serving God as they help us fulfill our mission to act as His hands, feet and arms to Guatemala’s needy children.